Molson Workers Turn Down Management Offers

Laval, February 11, 2018 – Workers at the Molson Brewery on Notre-Dame Street in Montréal turned down their employer’s offers at a union meeting this Sunday. The union does not yet have a strike mandate and is not planning on exercising pressure tactics for the time being.

Sticking points at the bargaining table include pensions, group insurance, outsourcing, and wages. The negotiating committee would like to resume talks as soon as possible. No further meetings with management have been scheduled at this time.

Teamsters Local Union 1999 represents some 650 workers at the brewery, including those who bottle and delivery Molson products.

Teamsters represent the interests of nearly 125,000 workers in Canada, including 40,000 in Québec. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications and Public Affairs
Portable: 514 609-5101
slacroix@teamsters.ca

Teamsters Local 91 Cooney members have overwhelmingly accepted a new five-year collective agreement over four votes held January 27 and 28, 2018. Local 91 sincerely thanks the committee members from Cooney Bulk Sales and Cooney Transport who worked tirelessly towards the final recommended offer. The accepted offer annually increases mileage rates, hourly rates and U.S. mileage rates amongst many other significant improvements. As well, members will benefit from seven annual ‘weather / traffic delay’ days allowing them to declare an hourly day as opposed to limiting flat rates. This will be a significant improvement in driver safety on an annual basis, supporting our over 120 professional drivers.

The previous agreement expired in late 2016. The new agreement provides the companies and the members with stability moving forward in a competitive market, laced with challenges. Members can report for work on Monday knowing their working conditions are on the rise. This will help improve workers’ quality of life and will benefit their families. President Brian MacDonald thanks members for their patience and participation throughout the process, noting that Cooney drivers will once again enjoy some of the best working conditions in the Ontario – Quebec 401 corridor.

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Brian A. MacDonald, BA, (Hons) Law
President
Teamsters Local Union No. 91
Assistant Federal Political Coordinator – Teamsters Canada

Laval, January 24, 2018 – Saint-Leonard-Saint-Michel Liberal MP Nicola Di Iorio said he believes that truck drivers should be required to undergo random testing for cannabis.

The Teamsters Union opposes this possible measure not only because it would violate workers’ right to privacy, but also, because a positive test result does not necessarily prove that the person is intoxicated. For example, a truck driver may have used cannabis 72 hours before driving and have a positive test result without being impaired.

In addition, the technology currently used to measure THC levels in the blood is not entirely reliable and test results could be challenged in court.

“Everyone is in favour of improving our road safety record, says Teamsters Canada President François Laporte. But it would be wrong to automatically associate road safety with drug use.”

Reversing the deregulation of the trucking industry would be a better place to start. The regulatory relief introduced in the 1980s had perverse effects, such as the emergence of small transport companies offering cut-throat delivery rates. This led to the dramatic deterioration of working conditions for drivers and to a number of structural problems that have been undermining the industry for some 30 years.

“Instead of talking about depriving of workers’ basic rights, the Member of Parliament would be well-advised to promote reasonable hours of work and decent working conditions for truck drivers,” the Union leader adds. “This would have a direct and positive impact on road safety because our members would no longer need to work 50-60 hours a week just to make ends meet.”

The Teamsters union represents close to 125,000 workers across Canada, including 15,000 truck drivers in Canada. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications and Public Affairs
Cell: 514-609-5101
slacroix@teamsters.ca

Laval, January 23, 2018 – The Teamsters Union is disappointed that the Government of Canada will sign the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). The agreement, reached after two days of talks in Tokyo, was confirmed by an International Trade spokesperson and could be ratified in March.

Under the TPP, the federal government made concessions regarding access to Canada’s dairy market, which is bad news for the estimated that 221,000 Canadians who depend on the dairy industry for their livelihood. The Teamsters Union therefore asks Prime Minister Trudeau to compensate dairy workers, especially in the processing sector, who will be negatively impacted by the TPP.

Teamsters also view the TPP’s provisions on labour rights as inadequate, seeing as Canadian workers will now be competing with cheap labour in Pacific Rim countries like Malaysia and Vietnam, where working conditions are much lower than those in Canada.

“The TPP stands to hurt Canadian workers,” warns the president of Teamsters Canada, François Laporte. “The TPP is a race to bottom with respect to working conditions and environmental protection.”

This development caught the Teamsters Union by surprise and adds to Canadians’ distrust of trade agreements. The concerns expressed by unions and civil society organizations were not taken into consideration during these negotiations.

“The federal government seems focused on the interests of the middle class and the environment in its negotiations to renew NAFTA,” concludes Laporte. “With respect to the TPP, Canada has done the exact opposite.”

“We expected better from the Trudeau government.”

Teamsters Canada represents 125,000 members in Canada in all industries. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Christopher Monette
Director of Public Affairs
Teamsters Canada
Cell: 514-226-6002
cmonette@teamsters.ca

Laval, January 19, 2018 — The Teamsters Union is relieved by the acquittal of three Montreal, Maine & Atlantic workers who were accused of criminal negligence causing death in the Lac-Mégantic derailment. The lengthy trial highlighted major shortcomings in the rail industry and the Teamsters believe it is now time for Transport Canada to act decisively to ensure the safety of the general public and of workers.

“Installing cameras to monitor train workers does nothing to improve safety in this industry, warned Teamsters Canada President François Laporte. Increasing safety requires hiring railway inspectors, allowing workers to rest when they are tired, and most importantly, monitoring the rail carriers very closely as well as ensuring a transparent public consultation before granting a rail carrier an exemption to a safety rule.”

“These are the types of measures that will reduce the risk of such a tragedy happening again.”

The evidence filed by the Crown apparently failed to convince the jury: after deliberating for nine days, they returned with a unanimous verdict of “not guilty”.

“My thoughts are, once again, with the families and friends of the victims of the tragedy, said the Union leader. I simply want to tell them that I strongly believe this disaster was caused by a careless employer and that justice will be done when the criminal trial of the MM & A is over.”

The Teamsters union represents close to 125,000 workers across Canada, including 12,000 workers in the rail industry. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications and Public Affairs
Cell: 514-609-5101
slacroix@teamsters.ca

Teamsters Canada was deeply disappointed to learn that Unifor is leaving the CLC. The CLC is still the house of labour, representing 3 million working men and women in Canada. The labour movement is stronger than any single one of its affiliates.

In its letter to the CLC, Unifor claims that international unions do not have legitimate elections for Canadian leadership positions. This is not an accurate portrayal. Many international unions, like Teamsters Canada, enjoy their full autonomy and conduct competitive rank & file elections. Our union is proud of its ‘one member, one vote’ policy. Every member of our union can vote to elect the president of Teamsters Canada.

We live in an era of rising inequality, automation and globalization, Unifor’s “empty chair” policy will end up harming the labour movement. Disagreements in the house of labour must be resolved within the house of labour, not outside.

Teamsters Canada continues to have full confidence in the CLC and its leader Hassan Yussuff. We will continue to work with the CLC for the benefit of our members and all workers.

François Laporte
President of Teamsters Canada

Teamsters Canada represents 125,000 members in Canada in all industries. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:

Christopher Monette
Director of Public Affairs
Teamsters Canada
Cell: 514-226-6002
cmonette@teamsters.ca

Brother Daniel Thimineur has been appointed as a full time member of the Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB), and will assume his new duties January 29, 2018.

He is a lawyer since 1987 has represented members of the Teamsters Joint Council 91 since 1989. Daniel has defended the rights of Teamsters members throughout his long professional career.

The CIRB is a government organization mandated to interpret and administer the Canada Labour Code for unions and employers under federal jurisdiction, including those in banking, transport and telecommunications. More specifically, Daniel will fulfill the duties of union representative to the CIRB for the next three years.

“I am leaving the Teamsters with a sense of accomplishment,” mused Daniel. “I will miss the Teamsters family, especially the members of my team, with whom I have fought so many union battles to defend workers’ rights.”

The position of union representative to the CIRB is a prestigious one, and an honour for both Mr. Thimineur and for the Teamsters.

“I would like to thank Daniel for his 28 years of good and loyal service,” said Canadian Teamsters President François Laporte. “I am very proud of his appointment, and I wish him every success in his new duties.”

Melville, SK, December 23, 2017 – A Canadian National (CN) worker died following a workplace accident yesterday in Melville, Saskatchewan. The worker was a 26 year-old woman with approximately three years of experience. Her name is not being released.

“Instead of celebrating the holidays, the family of one our Teamster sisters will be in mourning,” said François Laporte, President of Teamsters Canada, the union representing workers at CN. “On behalf of Canada’s 125,000 Teamster members, I would like to express my sincerest condolences to her family, friends and co-workers.”

Teamsters have been advised that a Transportation Safety Board (TSB) investigation is ongoing. The union will cooperate fully with the TSB and monitor the investigation’s progress closely.

“While the loss of a fellow worker is always tragic, it seems even more so at this time of year when families and friends are foremost in our thoughts,” said Doug Finnson, President of Teamsters Canada Rail Conference (TCRC). “As we gather with our families and celebrate Christmas, let us all think of our sisters and brothers, and let us keep a place in our hearts for our deceased co-worker and her family.”

“We remind everyone to stay vigilant and aware of their surroundings at all times while at work,” added Finnson.

Out of respect for the victim’s loved ones, and because of the ongoing investigation, the Teamsters Union will make no further comment at this time.

Teamsters represent close to 125,000 workers across Canada, including 12,000 workers in the rail industry. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Media requests:

Christopher Monette
Director of Public Affairs, Teamsters Canada
Cell: 514-226-6002
cmonette@teamsters.ca

Sisters, Brothers,

Brother Pat Pope
Brother Pat Pope

It is with a sad and heavy heart I am informing you of the passing of Brother Pat Pope. As you know Pat was a long-time member and officer of Teamsters Local 987. His dedicated service spans 40 years as a Local 987 member, Executive Board member, Business Agent, and past President.

Pat’s commitment to the Union movement, to Teamsters Canada and Local 987 was unwavering in his compassion, sincerity, and commitment. He exuded a larger-than-life personality and was truly a force to be reckoned with whether in collective bargaining or organizing new groups of members. I’m sure we all wish his wife and his extended family our deepest condolences during this difficult time.

I’ve enclosed a link to his obituary.
http://www.springfieldfuneralhome.com/obituaries/pope-patrick-shane/
Sincerely

David Froelich
Secretary Treasurer
Teamsters Local Union No. 987

Laval, November 28, 2017 — Molson Coors announced this morning that it will be moving its plant to Montréal’s South Shore, close to the Saint-Hubert airport.

The brewery’s bid announced this morning still has to be approved by the City of Longueuil.

At Teamsters Canada, this news is being received with a mixture of relief and concern after months of rumours and speculation about the location of the new plant. Unfortunately, we still do not know the brewer’s intentions regarding the production volume of beer in brown glass bottles vs. cans at the new plant.

A brown bottle production line employs close to 4 times more workers than a can production line.

Consequently, if the company makes an even greater shift towards cans in its new plant, the industrial peace between the brewer and its Teamsters Local Union 1999 workers could be at risk. Note that 71 jobs have already been lost at the Notre-Dame Street plant over the past few years due to the shift towards beer cans; additional job losses are expected if the brewer stays this course.

Cans are less environmentally friendly than brown glass bottles because they end up in landfills almost 30% of the time.

Europe Turns Its Back on Cans

Europe has been rejecting cans for a long time. A number of European countries have had the courage to implement incentives and regulations forcing the industry to use more refillable containers, such as the brown bottle.

Denmark, for example, has banned the sale of cans outright. Breweries there have no problems surviving these regulatory “constraints”, which are based totally on the principle of producer responsibility. This is, in fact, an environmentally responsible choice and shows real concern for the well-being of future generations. Consequently, the argument of needing to “respond to consumer demand” as maintained by Molson Coors, does not apply in Denmark.

The Teamsters Union will be keeping a close eye on the situation with a view to preserving the environment and protecting the jobs of its members at Molson Coors.

The Teamsters union represents close to 125,000 workers across Canada, including 12,000 workers in the rail industry. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications and Public Affairs
Cell: 514-609-5101
slacroix@teamsters.ca

Additional facts and figures:

  • The brown bottle employs hundreds of workers who pay taxes and who contribute to society and the economic health of Quebec.
  • Major brewers are responsible for more than 25,000 indirect jobs.
  • The brown bottle is greener than any other container because it can be reused up to 17 times before it is crushed and melted to make a new bottle.
  • Several European countries, including Denmark, have practically banned cans in favour of brown bottles.
  • While brewers maintain that consumers want their beer in cans, we believe that the increase in the availability of beer in cans (rather than the demand for it) has contributed to declining sales of beer in brown glass bottles.
  • Under the Recyc-Québec agreement, there are fines for brewers selling more than 37% of their beer production in cans.
  • All too often, cans end up in landfills. Consequently, their environmental footprint is greater than that of bottles.

For further information, visit MieuxEnBouteille.ca (French only) or Brown Bottle campaign.